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Santa Clara County restraining order defense attorneyOften, an order of protection, or restraining order, is issued as a result of a domestic violence allegation. In California, domestic violence is defined as abuse or threats of abuse when the abuser and the abused are in an intimate relationship, or are closely related by blood or marriage. If you have been served with a restraining order, it is important that you fully understand the things that the order can and cannot do and how it will affect you.

Who Can Ask For a Restraining Order?

In California, a person can ask for a domestic violence restraining order if they and their alleged abuser are:

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San Jose domestic violence restraining order defense attorneyThe state of California takes domestic violence very seriously, and state laws allow someone who has been abused or is under the threat of harm to receive a restraining order to protect their safety. While it is important to protect the victims of abuse, false accusations against alleged abusers can result in a great deal of emotional distress, financial hardship, and damage to personal relationships. If you have been served with a domestic violence restraining order, you should understand your rights and the steps you can take to defend against the charges.

Restraining Orders in California

A person can seek a restraining order against a spouse, ex-spouse, domestic partner, close family member, or parent of their child who has abused or threatened to abuse them. When granted by a judge, restraining orders can require someone to stay away from the alleged victims and their children and relatives, move out of their house, pay child support and/or partner support, or follow certain other orders.

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San Jose Green Card Marriage Domestic ViolenceFraudulent green card marriages are nothing new. With the advent of films like “The Proposal,” it is well-known that many marriages take place for the sole purpose of a green card or to avoid deportation. In 2009, about 506 of 241,154 green card petitions were denied for fraud. However, it is unknown how many fraudulent marriages have actually occurred. 

Unfortunately for many, a so-called “green card marriage” often leads to accusations of domestic violence. Immigrant victims of domestic violence do not have to wait for naturalization to divorce their spouse and stay in the U.S. Instead, they can apply for a U visa, which is a visa that provides nonimmigrant status to victims of certain qualifying crimes. U visa recipients can apply for a green card after a certain number of years. 

In order to be eligible for a U visa, the victim must agree to aid in the investigation or prosecution of the crime he or she was a victim of. 

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Domestic ViolenceIf you are going through a divorce, being accused of domestic violence can negatively impact your case. Many people incorrectly believe that domestic violence charges are only addressed in criminal court and will have no bearing on a family law case. However, that is far from the truth. A mere allegation of domestic violence can affect the amount you may be required to pay in spousal and child support and can restrict your child custody and visitation rights.

Child Custody and Visitation (Parenting Time)

If there is a domestic violence charge against you while you are going through divorce proceedings, you could lose custody of your children. Whether you are being accused of abusing either your spouse or your children is irrelevant. Any alleged abuse committed against family members may result in the court finding that there is a rebuttable presumption that you are an unfit parent. In addition, because the court is committed to protecting the best interests of children, you may not be awarded custody if the court believes it would be against your children’s best interests.  

If you are not granted child custody, you may share parenting time with the other parent. However, if you are accused or convicted of family violence, then the visits with your child could be significantly limited in length and frequency. In addition, you may be required to have your visits supervised by a neutral third party. 

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